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Empower Your Instinct

Psychology Insight for Marketers

   
MotiveMetrics

New data challenges marketers’ assumptions about their followers' personality traits

We recently conducted a survey of more than 125 marketers (31 percent CMOs), asking how they would characterize the personality of their company’s Twitter following. The findings demonstrate that most marketers are not able to accurately identify the key personality traits that trigger purchase decisions. While more than half (62 percent) of respondents indicated their following was susceptible to discount offers, MotiveMetrics data shows that only 12 percent respond to discount offers. In fact, 79 percent of the followers were coupon-averse meaning at best they aren’t swayed by a coupon and at worst are turned off by products that are marketed with a coupon.

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Posted by Emily Dyess on Jun 30, 2015

motivationanalysis

Motivation Analysis: The Key to Making Splash Pages that Convert

The brain can process an image in 13 milliseconds—a rate of about 75 frames per second. This means from the moment the user hits your page they are forming impressions about your brand, products or service offerings. Today, most blog posts will offer a few universal strategies for creating splash pages that convert; feature real people, use benefit statements, write pithy headlines, keep important elements above the fold.

The problem with treating strategies as universal is that each audience engages with design and content in a unique way. As a result, there’s no such thing as a universal design that will always offer high conversions. The only data-driven way to create a high converting splash page is to understand the variables associated with the desired behavior (e.g. time on page, engagement, click-thru and conversions etc). Motivation Analysis is a new approach that leverages psychology to accurately measure the variables associated with behavior. Marketers can now collect accurate data about what drives an audience to engage and convert when visiting your splash page.

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Posted by Emily Dyess on Oct 8, 2014

psychology motivations Psychology and Design Motivation Analysis

scarcitymarketing_blogimg

Why Scarcity Marketing Doesn’t Work for Every Brand

Psychology provides marketers with a tremendous amount of research and knowledge about effectively engaging customers. In fact, a lot of commonly used marketing techniques are deeply rooted in psychological functions (e.g. social proof, scarcity, anchor pricing etc.) In order to use these techniques most effectively, it’s critical to understand the psychological differences between target audiences. Psychological traits, enduring patterns of behavior, provide the context needed to understand how techniques like scarcity marketing would impact engagement for a particular audience.

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Posted by Emily Dyess on Sep 17, 2014

Psychology and Marketing psychology psychological traits

values-blogpost

Why Personal Values are the Key to a Great Marketing Campaign

In 1997, Steve Jobs explained one of the most important principles of marketing in six words: “To me marketing is about Values.” He goes on to describe how some of the most iconic and successful brands resonate with customer’s personal values. This is a principle worth expanding upon.

We all live by a set of values that are important (or unimportant) to us. Some people value having fun and seeking adventure (Hedonism). Some value having influence and control over subordinates (Power). Still, others value helping people and making the world a better place (Benevolence). Values are beliefs and goals that transcend specific situations to motivate behavior. Understanding what consumers value is important because, much like personality traits and other individual differences, values have demonstrated powerful predictive ability in a number of customer experience and marketing operations. Values have also been shown to predict a variety of specific purchasing behaviors from choosing a new pair of sunglasses to purchasing environmentally friendly or organic products.

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Posted by Carson Sandy on Apr 4, 2014

personality psychology Consumer Behavior Buying Behavior shopping personality values

Screen_Shot_2014-11-17_at_9.58.18_AM

In the debate of Trait theory vs. Type theory, most psychologists agree traits are a more accurate way of understanding people. That is, traits are an easily measured and quantifiable way to account for someone's basic personality characteristics, which are now being used to predict consumer behavior.

 
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Posted by Angela Bray on Feb 17, 2014

personality psychology psychology traits psychological traits personality traits

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Traits vs. Types