.

.

Empower Your Instinct

Psychology Insight for Marketers

   
motivationanalysis

Motivation Analysis: The Key to Making Splash Pages that Convert

The brain can process an image in 13 milliseconds—a rate of about 75 frames per second. This means from the moment the user hits your page they are forming impressions about your brand, products or service offerings. Today, most blog posts will offer a few universal strategies for creating splash pages that convert; feature real people, use benefit statements, write pithy headlines, keep important elements above the fold.

The problem with treating strategies as universal is that each audience engages with design and content in a unique way. As a result, there’s no such thing as a universal design that will always offer high conversions. The only data-driven way to create a high converting splash page is to understand the variables associated with the desired behavior (e.g. time on page, engagement, click-thru and conversions etc). Motivation Analysis is a new approach that leverages psychology to accurately measure the variables associated with behavior. Marketers can now collect accurate data about what drives an audience to engage and convert when visiting your splash page.

more

Posted by Emily Dyess on Oct 8, 2014

psychology motivations Psychology and Design Motivation Analysis

scarcitymarketing_blogimg

Why Scarcity Marketing Doesn’t Work for Every Brand

Psychology provides marketers with a tremendous amount of research and knowledge about effectively engaging customers. In fact, a lot of commonly used marketing techniques are deeply rooted in psychological functions (e.g. social proof, scarcity, anchor pricing etc.) In order to use these techniques most effectively, it’s critical to understand the psychological differences between target audiences. Psychological traits, enduring patterns of behavior, provide the context needed to understand how techniques like scarcity marketing would impact engagement for a particular audience.

more

Posted by Emily Dyess on Sep 17, 2014

Psychology and Marketing psychology psychological traits

Screen_Shot_2014-11-17_at_9.58.18_AM

In the debate of Trait theory vs. Type theory, most psychologists agree traits are a more accurate way of understanding people. That is, traits are an easily measured and quantifiable way to account for someone's basic personality characteristics, which are now being used to predict consumer behavior.

 
more

Posted by Angela Bray on Feb 17, 2014

personality psychology psychology traits psychological traits personality traits

The Psychology of Internet Trolls

Portrait of a Troll: Q&A with Dr. Erin Buckels

Internet trolls are everywhere, but what is it that makes them tick? From the pesky people starting a full blown battle on your blog posts to the naive friends who “feed the trolls” in a comment thread, there’s no denying trolls are a vibrant part of most internet communities.  Until now, little formal research has been conducted to understand what motivates people to engage in this type of behavior. An aptly named new study, “Trolls just want to have fun,” explores the personality traits of an Internet troll. Dr. Erin Buckels and her colleagues examined the specific relationship between personality traits and various online commenting behaviors (e.g., chatting, debating, trolling).

more

Posted by Carson Sandy on Feb 12, 2014

personality psychology Buying Behavior psychology motivations personality personality traits

jaguarsuperbowl

Why marketers advertise to consumers who can’t afford their product

Advertising dollars are spent to reach potential consumers and inform them about a product, and perhaps the single largest American venue to do this is the Super Bowl. Companies that buy ad time during the Super Bowl have the potential to extend the reach of their ad if it makes a splash and gets talked about in the follow-up news cycle, so it’s no wonder so many companies are willing to pay top dollar for Super Bowl ads. However, it would seem this money would only be well spent if the Super Bowl audience included a large proportion of potential consumers for a given product; otherwise, how would such a massive expense pay off?

more

Posted by Kyle Thomas on Jan 31, 2014

Consumer Behavior product products Psychology and Marketing Advertising and Psychology psychology marketing

Email

Follow Us