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The Unspoken Truth

The study of words. The science of response.

Weather

How the Weather Impacts Your Work Habits and Buying Behavior

We all know the weather outside can tremendously impact our daily outlook on life, but what role does it play in our buying behavior and work habits? We associate sunshine with happiness and stormy weather with bad moods and misfortune. Indeed, there is no dearth of research supporting the fact that the forecast can significantly influence individuals’ mood and temperament. For example, increased sunshine is associated with better moods and an increased willingness to help others, and there is a mood disorder -- Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) -- characterized by depressive symptoms brought on by the winter months. It’s pretty much common sense in today’s day and age that nice weather makes us happy, but can it actually affect our daily behavior? The answer, it turns out, is yes, and researchers are working to figure out exactly how and why.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on Aug 26, 2013

personality psychology Consumer Behavior Consumer Profiling Buying Behavior Nonconscious Motivations Research Traits and Scales Research Methods Purchasing Behavior

ShoppingEmotion

How Emotions Impact Shopping Behavior

You walk into a clothing store, just to browse. A shirt catches your eye and without comparing the quality of the materials or craftsmanship to those of the shirt next to it, and even before fully comparing the styles of the two, you know you want it. It’s just so you. All rational thought (“I already have a few shirts like that one”) seems to go out the window as self-illusory hedonism takes over and you indulge in the purchase.
The above scenario is – most likely – all too familiar and is a perfect example of how we, as consumers making judgments, are prone to rely on our feelings and emotions, while shopping, momentarily letting our cognitive evaluations lapse. Of course, this isn’t always the case – if you’ve put time in research into a decision you won’t be as easily swayed by an alternative option. But, if you haven’t, and there are time constraints on your decision or little other available information, falling back on feelings is our default response.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on Jul 11, 2013

product-market fit products Buying Behavior Nonconscious Motivations Research Psychology and Marketing Emotions and Psychology

Priming

What is Priming? A Psychological Look at Priming & Consumer Behavior

As you’ve probably realized, various tenets of psychology are crucial to effective marketing. After all, psychology is about understanding human behavior and marketing is about applying that knowledge. There are many factors that influence this behavior, and while at least part of the human decision-making process is conscious, many of these factors influence behavior at a nonconscious level. As we have discussed previously on this blog, personality traits can serve as nonconscious motivations of behavior. In this post, I will introduce the psychological concept of priming, which can also have not-so-subtle influences on human behavior.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on Jul 1, 2013

Consumer Behavior priming and consumer behavior Nonconscious Motivations Research Psychology and Marketing Implicit vs Explicit

Psychometrics

What is psychometrics?

We’re all aware that individuals are unique and not everyone likes the same things. This uniqueness comes directly into play in the field of marketing. Since no two people are identical, marketing is about grouping and targeting. That is, higher levels of marketing success arise if you know who to target and how to target them instead of targeting everyone with a generic message. This necessity for specificity means targeting is essentially an empirical question that requires some form of measurement. Consumer behavior is ultimately a result of psychological processes and thus is an optimal target for measurement. Many people don’t think of individual or group characteristics as quantifiable entities, but they can be. Indeed, once you develop a method of quantification, objective grouping based on numbers becomes much easier and more reliable than subjective grouping based on descriptions of consumer traits. Clearly not all measurement is good measurement, so then the question becomes: “How should this measurement be done?” This is where psychometrics comes in.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on Jun 19, 2013

Nonconscious Motivations Research Traits and Scales Psychology and Marketing Research Methods Data Collection

PsychOfChoice

Psychology of Choice: How We Assess Risk When Buying Products

I started playing piano in first grade, and when I started, I was obsessed with piano. I loved the new instrument and couldn’t wait to get home from school to tinker with it and practice my newly learned pieces. Eventually, that fervent enthusiasm diminished and my mom struggled to get me to practice. She brought the matter up with my instructor who suggested an interesting solution: if I completed 15 minutes of practice on the pieces I was supposed to be working on, I could then choose to practice any of the songs in the book and show my instructor the following week. I ended up enthusiastically and diligently practicing for those 15 minutes, just so I could play what I wanted after. When I was being forced to practice, I had significantly less enthusiasm than when given the chance to exert my own will and choice. By giving me a choice about my actions, my teacher re-sparked my piano-playing interest. This phenomenon – that when given a choice of doing something, people are more likely to want to do that thing. The Psychology of Choice has important implications for marketing.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on May 22, 2013

segmentation packaging pricing product-market fit target audience Nonconscious Motivations Research Traits and Scales Psychology and Marketing Research Methods

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