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The Unspoken Truth

The study of words. The science of response.

values-blogpost

Why Personal Values are the Key to a Great Marketing Campaign

In 1997, Steve Jobs explained one of the most important principles of marketing in six words: “To me marketing is about Values.” He goes on to describe how some of the most iconic and successful brands resonate with customer’s personal values. This is a principle worth expanding upon.

We all live by a set of values that are important (or unimportant) to us. Some people value having fun and seeking adventure (Hedonism). Some value having influence and control over subordinates (Power). Still, others value helping people and making the world a better place (Benevolence). Values are beliefs and goals that transcend specific situations to motivate behavior. Understanding what consumers value is important because, much like personality traits and other individual differences, values have demonstrated powerful predictive ability in a number of customer experience and marketing operations. Values have also been shown to predict a variety of specific purchasing behaviors from choosing a new pair of sunglasses to purchasing environmentally friendly or organic products.

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Posted by Carson Sandy on Apr 4, 2014

personality psychology Consumer Behavior Buying Behavior shopping personality values

The Psychology of Internet Trolls

Portrait of a Troll: Q&A with Dr. Erin Buckels

Internet trolls are everywhere, but what is it that makes them tick? From the pesky people starting a full blown battle on your blog posts to the naive friends who “feed the trolls” in a comment thread, there’s no denying trolls are a vibrant part of most internet communities.  Until now, little formal research has been conducted to understand what motivates people to engage in this type of behavior. An aptly named new study, “Trolls just want to have fun,” explores the personality traits of an Internet troll. Dr. Erin Buckels and her colleagues examined the specific relationship between personality traits and various online commenting behaviors (e.g., chatting, debating, trolling).

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Posted by Carson Sandy on Feb 12, 2014

personality psychology Buying Behavior psychology motivations personality personality traits

Gift_Cards

Are Gift Cards Impersonal or Appreciated?

For many, the holidays are synonymous with stress. Shopping for anyone - parents and siblings, or spouses or friends, co-workers, and other relatives - can be stressful whether it be because of time limitations or budget. The overwhelming fear of buying the wrong gift for loved ones consumes many, resulting in gift cards, cash, or other tokens viewed by some as impersonal.

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Posted by Angela Bray on Dec 10, 2013

Consumer Behavior Buying Behavior psychology shopping holiday gifts

Weather

How the Weather Impacts Your Work Habits and Buying Behavior

We all know the weather outside can tremendously impact our daily outlook on life, but what role does it play in our buying behavior and work habits? We associate sunshine with happiness and stormy weather with bad moods and misfortune. Indeed, there is no dearth of research supporting the fact that the forecast can significantly influence individuals’ mood and temperament. For example, increased sunshine is associated with better moods and an increased willingness to help others, and there is a mood disorder -- Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) -- characterized by depressive symptoms brought on by the winter months. It’s pretty much common sense in today’s day and age that nice weather makes us happy, but can it actually affect our daily behavior? The answer, it turns out, is yes, and researchers are working to figure out exactly how and why.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on Aug 26, 2013

personality psychology Consumer Behavior Consumer Profiling Buying Behavior Nonconscious Motivations Research Traits and Scales Research Methods Purchasing Behavior

ShoppingEmotion

How Emotions Impact Shopping Behavior

You walk into a clothing store, just to browse. A shirt catches your eye and without comparing the quality of the materials or craftsmanship to those of the shirt next to it, and even before fully comparing the styles of the two, you know you want it. It’s just so you. All rational thought (“I already have a few shirts like that one”) seems to go out the window as self-illusory hedonism takes over and you indulge in the purchase.
The above scenario is – most likely – all too familiar and is a perfect example of how we, as consumers making judgments, are prone to rely on our feelings and emotions, while shopping, momentarily letting our cognitive evaluations lapse. Of course, this isn’t always the case – if you’ve put time in research into a decision you won’t be as easily swayed by an alternative option. But, if you haven’t, and there are time constraints on your decision or little other available information, falling back on feelings is our default response.

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Posted by Madeline Ford on Jul 11, 2013

product-market fit products Buying Behavior Nonconscious Motivations Research Psychology and Marketing Emotions and Psychology

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